Raymar Art Painting Competition Finalists (5th Annual Competition Month #10 - July 2011)

Select the competition you wish to view:  6th Annual Contest - Final Judging | 6th Annual Competition Month #12 - November 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #11 - October 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #10 - September 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #9 - August 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #8- July 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #7 - June 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #6 - May 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #5 -April 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #4 - March 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #3 - February 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #2 - January 2012 | 6th Annual Competition Month #1 - December 2011 | 5th Annual Competition - Final Judging | 5th Annual Competition Month #12- September 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #11- August 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #10 - July 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #9- June 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #8 - May 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #7- April 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #6- March 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #5- February 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #4- January 2011 | 5th Annual Competition Month #3- December 2010 | 5th Annual Competition Month #2- November 2010 | 5th Annual Competition Month #1- October 2010 | 4th Contest Final Judging Includes Aug 09-July 10 | July 2010 | June 2010 | May 2010 | April 2010 | March 2010 | February 2010 | January 2010 | December 2009 | November 2009 | October 2009 | September 2009 | August 2009 |  

  




   Best of Show - July 2011
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Mucha and Peonies by Michelle Dunaway
34" x 16" Oil

Judge's Comments: Creating poetry in a still life painting is difficult, but there is something animated in the arrangement of the peonies which stand out against the complementary color of the vase, and also seem to relate in terms of gesture to the figure in the Mucha painting above it. You seem to sense the movement in these flowers and their relationship to the figure in the painting. In terms of 'music', this painting has a very strong light/dark notan structure upon which the rest of the design hangs together. The lost edges between the light flowers and the light background of the Mucha painting create a large white shape in the center and upper part of the painting, and the dark shapes of the leaves blend with the background shadow on the bottom left to create another dark shape. Altogether this painting has a very beautiful notan structure. The painting harmonizes the complementary blue green of the vase and the red shapes of the peonies. The contrast of saturation between the lower saturation background and the higher saturation foreground objects (peonies and vase) gives emphasis to the vase and flowers. The repeated pattern of small blue flower shapes in the Mucha painting repeats the blue shapes in the vase helping to unify the design. The space division is interesting, with the long rectangular format of the painting mirroring the rectangular frame shape of the Mucha painting, once again unifying the design. The arrangement of the flower shapes is asymmetrical with the top left flower stalk on a slight diagonal, reflecting the diagonal line in the clothing of the figure in the Mucha painting. This subtle repetition adds to the unity of the painting. The thin vertical lines of the Mucha painting are slightly different in thickness (using the shadow to thicken the left hand vertical shapes) and so add variety to the design. The points of shapes in the Mucha painting and in the pattern of the vase, contrast with the lines of the picture frame and the vertical lines in the pattern of the vase and the flat shapes elsewhere in the painting, to provide a variety of point, line and mass - a key design element in a painting. The patterns in the vase, and in the Mucha painting further help to keep the viewer's eye engaged and allow the viewer to move from top to bottom of the painting enjoying these pieces of detail. The loosely painted background and to some extent the subdued detail in the peonies give the eye a place to rest after enjoying the detail in the rest of the painting. This is a still life with both poetry and music, a very difficult task to pull off, and done so well and creatively in this painting. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Remembering Home by Michelle Dunaway
20" x 15" Oil

Judge's Comments: I generally look for two key things in a painting. The first is the idea behind the painting and the emotion or feeling that it conveys to the viewer. I generally refer to as its 'poetry'. In this painting there is a strong feeling of someone thinking about something with longing. This is emphasized by the subject looking slightly away from the viewer and the slight tilt of the head. You can almost feel the woman's thoughts. The second thing I look for in a painting is its abstract design, or the 'music' of a painting. This is independent of subject matter and what distinguishes a work of art from an illustration. In this design, there is a strong light dark design (the notan structure of the painting) in which the dark pigtail shape of the hair creates a separate white shape to its right, to help create a series of unequal white shapes in the design. If you were to turn the painting upside down, and convert it to simple black and white shapes, the design would still be pleasing to the eye. The pigtail also acts to unify the painting with its long vertical shape and by contrast emphasizes the diagonal tile of the head. The right leaning diagonal strokes in the lower right hand side of the background provide a counterpoint to the left leaning strokes elsewhere in the design. The small cross around the neck provides a secondary focal point to the eyes and keeps the eye moving around the painting. The use of loose brushstrokes in the clothing and background provide an area for the eye to rest, allowing the viewer to better concentrate on the main focus of the painting. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Dream by Prafull Sawant
36 inches x 48 inches Oil

Judge's Comments: The notan structure of this painting is interesting, with the vertical light blue shape of the light on the figure in the reflection dividing the space of the painting into two middle gray shapes. The dominant value in this notan structure is gray, with the sub-dominant value of light. The color harmony is a triadic red, yellow and blue (if one of these colors had been less saturated, it would have improved the color harmony). The repeated red shapes (with slight variations in temperature) are a nice design element to keep the viewer's eye moving around the painting, but perhaps the red trousers are attracting too much attention away from the nicely painted center of interest which is the head and upper back of the figure. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Morning Market study by Sarah Kidner
12 x 16 Oil

Judge's Comments: In terms of poetry, this painting nicely captures the feeling of people browsing in a market place and examining what is on offer, capturing the feeling of a marketplace. With regards to the music in the painting, the pattern of dominating warm red, yellow, and orange shapes, with a few cool shapes for contrast gives this gives this painting an interesting abstract quality. A little more simplification of the shapes and slight variation in temperature between them would make this abstract design even stronger. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

PRINCIPIO by Carmelo Blandino
48 inches x 48 inches Oil

Judge's Comments: A nice variety of shapes, with variety of points, lines and masses gives music to this abstract painting. The dominant central shape unifies the complex shapes around it. (A little more use of grays would have made improved the color harmony somewhat.) Although mostly abstract, the dominating yellow flower with its dark abyss into which the small objects are about to enter give this painting poetry - telling the story of the beginning of life. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

"Friday Afternoon Model" by Michael McConnell
10 inches x 8 inches Oil

Judge's Comments: The simplification of shapes, interesting notan structure and loose brushwork gives this painting a nice abstract quality. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Bridge in Cologne by Gonzalo Ruiz Navarro
28 x 36 Oil

Judge's Comments: This painting has poetry in that it shows us how to find beauty in a our current environment, in this case a man-made one. Finding that beauty around us, and sharing it with viewers is the true hallmark of a creative contemporary artist, and to me is much more interesting than annacronistic images or scenes that have little relevance today. The music of this painting derives from the unity created by the repeating curved lines, with the dominant curve of the first arch giving unity to the design. The unity is further enhanced by the dominant cool temperature of the painting, with the red of the person on the bridge and the warm yellow background to the left of the painting providing some contrast to the dominant cool temperature. (A few more red shapes would have improved the interesting design of this painting). The loose brushwork and paint texture is nice. A little more variety in edges would have further enhanced this brushwork. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

"Facing The Elements" by Brian LaSaga
24 x 34 Acrylic

Judge's Comments: An unusual design, this painting emphasizes the rock formation jutting out into the sky by means of a low viewing angle. This enhances the feeling of majesty in the rock, giving poetry to this painting. It is difficult to come up with compositions in landscapes that are new, and this painting succeeds in its originality of design and concept. The repeating shapes of the rocks in the foreground echoing the composition of the rocks in the large principle rock formation of the painting give the design unity. The varying angles of the rocks in the middle distance provide a counterpoint to the main diagonal line of the principle rock formation, and add variety to the design. Perhaps a few more areas for the eye to rest in the painting would help the eye movement in the painting, as well as serve to emphasize the main rock formation. An extremely difficult painting and composition to pull off, this is an innovative design that has succeeded in creating both poetry and music. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Snow on the Plains by David Grossmann
9 inches x 12 inches Oil

Judge's Comments: Simple and quiet in composition, this painting communicates the feeling of tranquility and desolation in this snow scene, leading your eyes into the far distance and wondering what is out there. A truly poetic feeling. The music in the design is basically based around a simple two/three value notan structure. At one level there is a two value notan structure (a dark value shape for the trees, and dominant middle gray shape for the sky and ground). At the second level, the middle value gray shape is split into two unequally sized shapes of slightly different values (the sky shape and the ground shape). A touch more detail in the foreground would have enhanced the feeling of depth and provided a lead in for the eye into the distance. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Bully-Boy by C. E. Norton
10 x 10 Oil

Judge's Comments: A strong notan structure, nice color harmonies with a good use of grays to contrast the spots of saturated colors (such as the red color spots in the ears) combine to give this painting a nice abstract quality. The bold and confident brushwork further enhances the music in the painting. (More imbalance between the warm and cool shapes to make one or the other dominant, and less symmetry in the divisions of space in the painting would improve the unity in the painting and further enhance its music). And the cow is quite cute with its direct gaze at you! giving the painting its 'poetry'. It is quite clear what this painting is about. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Dancing Between the Rocks by Tibor Nagy
12 x 16 Oil

Judge's Comments: A nice variety of soft and hard edges, and variety in the level of detail give this painting a musical abstract quality with the feeling of a waterfall. The off center positioning of the white water foam divides the painting into areas of light and dark creating its notan structure. - Barry John Raybould







   Finalist
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Barry John Raybould

Evening Worship of River Godavari by Rajesh Sawant
24 inches x 12 inches Acrylic

Judge's Comments: The music in this painting derives from an interesting play of light, set off against the dark silhouette of the fountain to keep the eye moving around the painting. The analogous color harmony with touches of complementary blue accents harmonize the design. - Barry John Raybould







   $1,000 Winner
Award Sponsor: RayMar Art
Judge: Scott Christensen

Mucha and Peonies by Michelle Dunaway
34" x 16" Oil

Judge's Comments: I am impressed with Michelle's composition. It is extremely difficult to put a vase of flowers below an upright painting and hold it all together. The tension between the figure's head and the flowers, even the brush strokes in the top left, show a circular composition. If Michelle told me she were going to paint this, I would say good luck with that! Congratulations, you pulled it off - fantastic painting! - Scott Christensen Monthly Judge's Comments (July): Creating poetry in a still life painting is difficult, but there is something animated in the arrangement of the peonies which stand out against the complementary color of the vase, and also seem to relate in terms of gesture to the figure in the Mucha painting above it. You seem to sense the movement in these flowers and their relationship to the figure in the painting. In terms of 'music', this painting has a very strong light/dark notan structure upon which the rest of the design hangs together. The lost edges between the light flowers and the light background of the Mucha painting create a large white shape in the center and upper part of the painting, and the dark shapes of the leaves blend with the background shadow on the bottom left to create another dark shape. Altogether this painting has a very beautiful notan structure. The painting harmonizes the complementary blue green of the vase and the red shapes of the peonies. The contrast of saturation between the lower saturation background and the higher saturation foreground objects (peonies and vase) gives emphasis to the vase and flowers. The repeated pattern of small blue flower shapes in the Mucha painting repeats the blue shapes in the vase helping to unify the design. The space division is interesting, with the long rectangular format of the painting mirroring the rectangular frame shape of the Mucha painting, once again unifying the design. The arrangement of the flower shapes is asymmetrical with the top left flower stalk on a slight diagonal, reflecting the diagonal line in the clothing of the figure in the Mucha painting. This subtle repetition adds to the unity of the painting. The thin vertical lines of the Mucha painting are slightly different in thickness (using the shadow to thicken the left hand vertical shapes) and so add variety to the design. The points of shapes in the Mucha painting and in the pattern of the vase, contrast with the lines of the picture frame and the vertical lines in the pattern of the vase and the flat shapes elsewhere in the painting, to provide a variety of point, line and mass - a key design element in a painting. The patterns in the vase, and in the Mucha painting further help to keep the viewer's eye engaged and allow the viewer to move from top to bottom of the painting enjoying these pieces of detail. The loosely painted background and to some extent the subdued detail in the peonies give the eye a place to rest after enjoying the detail in the rest of the painting. This is a still life with both poetry and music, a very difficult task to pull off, and done so well and creatively in this painting. -Barry John Raybould - Scott Christensen